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Morning Joe

News/Business. Joe Scarborough, Mika Brzezinski & Willie Geist offering interviews with newsmakers and politicians. New.

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03:01:00

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mpeg2video

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ac3

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TOPIC FREQUENCY

Us 31, Angie 16, America 12, Donny 12, United States Postal 12, Washington 12, Egypt 10, Marty Glickman 9, U.s. 9, New York 8, Mitch Mcconnell 8, New York City 7, Obama 7, Boston 7, Edward Snowden 6, Jim Morrison 6, Texas 6, Kathleen 6, Marty 6, Christie 6,
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  MSNBC    Morning Joe    News/Business. Joe Scarborough, Mika Brzezinski & Willie  
   Geist offering interviews with newsmakers and politicians. New.  

    August 21, 2013
    3:00 - 6:01am PDT  

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i've always talked about outside is so underrated. here is a good scene from that one. . >> can i buy you a drink? >> it's great, because she's going to end up having to bust him and it was good chemistry between j.lo and clooney. by the way, "morning joe" starts right now. good morning. it is wednesday, august the 21st. i'm katty kay alongside donny deutsch. joe and mika have the morning off. joining us on set, former communications director for president george w. bush is nicole wallace. and thomas roberts is here as well, looking very dapper.
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>> and joe and mika are away, but mommy and daddy, you look good. fresh in from the hamptons. >> we take this job very seriously. we make sure we are color coordinated. >> there is bill deblasio, front runner for mayor, lifelong boston red sox fan, born in cambridge. nicole wallace, you're communications expert. you stand tall, you come off like mitt romney and change teams. >> you've got to stand tall. politics 101, anyone who's ever, on a bus tour, bus tour, anyone? before you get off the bus, the last thing you ask your communications director is, who's the home team? who do they all root for? what hats are they going to be wearing? this is, you know, so fundamental to feeling like the person we might vote for is someone that cares about the same things i do. and nothing unites people more than rooting for the same team. >> it's who he is, he can't deny
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it. it's like there's a history there. if you were his opponent, though, the ad agency guy, wouldn't you start running ads up the flagpole. >> if i was advising him, i would say, look, have some fun with this. i would say, cheer me on the streets and boo me at the stadium. use it to your point, this is who i am, be the guy you boo at the stadium. if he moves sides, immediately you've got no core there, walk right into it and say, my heart's in new york. >> and he says he's going to celebrate any new york victory. but what happens if there's a red sox victory and he has to celebrate that too. >> i would actually, thomas, create a hat for him, down the middle, new york/boston. you know, at the end of the day, new york voters are smart. >> you can be bi in baseball. you can be bi . >> i think opponents will have a field day. >> i think it's a probable. it's like living in manchester and supporting liverpool. you can't do it. >> i, once again, bill, stand
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tall, bi in baseball according to thomas roberts. >> correct. i stand firm by that. let's get some news now. this is real news, of course, but let's get some other real news. the fight for control of the federal government, both in next year's mid-term elections and in 2016 is beginning to take shape around, yes, of course, the repeal of obama care. and last night at a heritage foundation defund obama care event in texas, senator ted cruz tried to rally conservatives. >> what happens next is president obama and harry reid are going to scream and yell those mean, nasty republicans are threatening to shut down the federal government. what has to happen after that is we've got to do something that conservatives haven't done in a long time. we've got to stand up and win the argument.
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why is it that every reporter in the media and a significant percentage of republicans assume with an impasse that president obama will never, ever, ever give up his principals so republicans have to give up theirs. if you have an impasse, you want to know one side or the other has to blink. how do we win this fight? don't blink! >> by the way, cruz was heckled at that event by people saying they wanted health care as well, but there were more supporters, as he said, than there were hecklers. earlier, though, former u.s. senator jim demint and president of the heritage foundation said any congressional republicans who oppose their effort should be replaced. the debate over how to defeat the affordable care act has put a target on several republicans up for re-election next year, including senator minority leader, mitch mcconnell. >> in american slang, the chicken represents a coward.
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the coward is also representative of a new breed of republicans in washington. take senate minority leader mitch mcconnell. on the issue of obama care, he says -- >> this law is a disaster and i want you to know, we're not backing down from this fight. >> but when he has the chance to defund obama care, some say he is chickening out. senator mcconnell, conservatives don't need a chicken when it comes to obama care. leaders lead. but if you fund it, you own it. >> what an absolutely stupid ad. am i the only one -- i watched the east side cruz up there and i kind of say, is he not getting the memo from chris christie as far as what's going to get you elected going forward. this party of no. this anger, this, i'm strong, you're a chicken, this, i'm strong, you're a chicken. who is that talking to? it's so tone deaf, it's so tone deaf, party of no. kill obama care versus watch what christie is doing, time after time, decision after time, moderate, moderate, moderate.
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nicole, am i missing thing here? >> it's not just chris christie. the problem with what ted cruz is doing, it's intellectually dishonest. and there's a great piece this morning written by pete waner, a very thoughtful conservative who wrote pieces for president bush, he was also asked at that event, why don't we impeach president obama, and he said, because we don't have the votes. the true answer, the intellectually honest answer is because he has not committed an impeachable defense. ted cruz is doing a whole lot of fearmongering and he's lying to the voters and presenting an untruthful case. the reason we're going to lose this debate about defunding obama care is because we don't occupy the white house. we don't have the ability to pass laws and then sign them. >> off of that point, we have an excerpt from commentary magazine about the dangers that are basically facing ted cruz. and in that article, the author
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writes, "what's troubling, because it's more revealing, is that senator cruz, rather than challenging the premise of his questions, pandered to the audience member. a more responsible and genuinely conservative lawmaker would have answered the question asked of him by saying something like this, impeachment requires an impeachable offense. the president has done many things i disagree with and i'm determined to fight and resist them, but that doesn't mean he has done anything impeachable. he is elected president, i'm an elected senator, we each have to do what we believe in. >> it's to lay the foundation brick by brick by running a successful national campaign. >> we're seeing republicans all over the country to weigh in on this and republicans on the state level, their opposition to obama care presents a different set of challenges, though. texas governor rick perry is reportedly negotiating with white house officials to accept $100 million available through the affordable care act to care for the elderly and disabled.
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perry has zounds tdenounced the law, but he would be helping about 12,000 texans during the first year of the program. there are about 900 governors who have opposed the federal care act, but say, we like the provisions, give me the cash as well. >> you have access to the money, whi why not take. >> it's kind of surprising from rick perry. he's been so vociferous about the charges of -- >> maybe he forgot he was against it. >> what was that thing? there was another thing i was opposed to. >> education. i want to just go back to -- forget even the obama care. to me, still the tone of going backwards on of no, of anger, of backwards, it's just, that's not what -- obama care or not obama care, it's just -- how many times do these guys have to
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learn, how many elections do they have to lose? >> there are plenty of elections out there saying, we have to offer alternatives, we have to propose things. and i think what we're talking about a little bit, nicole, this relationship between primary politics and general election politics. and i think ted cruz is speaking to a base that would help him in a primary-type situation and not a general election. it's not an electable approach in a general election, but might get him a lot of support and a lot of attention and maybe sell a lot of books at some point. >> let me debunk this notion that you have to be as crazy as you can be to win a primary. primary voters are the most passionate conservatives, the most passionate participants in elections. they want to win. they want to win national elections, ultimately. now, a fraction of them are passing a purity test, a fraction of them, lateral in places like iowa, care a whole lot about social agenda. a vast majority of voters want to win in iowa. >> if you got up on the stump
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and said, guys, my first objective is, we need to win. i hear what you're saying in terms of some of these more fringe issues and some of the far right, we're not going to get there. come with me. i'll ask where we need to get to, but you need to trust -- like, people can do math. people can figure it out. if you say to a republican, look, you have two choices, three choices. one is a far right person that's never going to be in the white house. two is me that's going to get in the white house as a republican and really, really hear and listen to you, or three, we lose like always, democrats here. >> and i don't think it's either/or. there are a lot of republicans, jeb bush, paul ryan, chris christie who really adhere to different swaths of truly conservative ideology while not forgetting that their primary function is to governor. >> but look at mcconnell, who has tried to paychey ed tied to if we basically shut down government in order to defund
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obama care, the voters will turn on us. this will be a colossal disaster for the american economy, for the state of this country, the markets would panic, interest rates would rise. we would all feel it if government were shut down. and we've been down the road and we happen to get hit by ads like this. it's a stupid, crazy ad, but he still gets hit with the notion -- >> the notion that their campaign, they're not having to do something to respond to it, is ridiculous. >> also, i agree with you, donny. it's this setting of litmus tests. if you decide you're not going to defund obama care, you should be primaried. if you vote in favor of immigration reform, you should be primaried. if you vote to expand background checks on gun control, you should be primaried. it's this setting of limits and this is what you can do if you're a republican. if you don't do things, you're outside the tent. nicole, suspect that a problem for the party? >> it is. and i think it's one the more thoughtful voices are trying to overcome. that's why people are watching chris christie carefully. he, so far, hasn't done too many
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things to make people worried that he is governing in a way anything other than what's right for the people. >> after spending months and millions of dollars campaigning against a national gun registry, it turns out the nra has one of its own. a new story from buzzfeed reveals that the nra has compiled information on tens of millions of gun owners without their consent. the database has been built through years of acquiring gun permit registration lists from state and county offices, gathering names of new owners from the thousands of gun safety classes taught by nra instructors and buy lists of attendees at gun shows. a spokesperson says he was asked by buzzfeed, who replied, that's none of your wbusiness. >> by the way, i'm confused. that's an nra registrar? >> but that's their business
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model. that's good business. why not know who owns a gun in the country so you can solicit them to be a part of your group. isn't that business strategy? >> isn't that unperson? >> business, capitalism? isn't that un-american? >> if you buy a car seat, you're in a registry. if you buy a highchair -- >> but a central part of the nra's opposition to expand -- >> is the federal government's -- zpr right. if you're an nra member, if you're opposed to gun control, your main fear is it's the government -- >> the philosophical objection to all the nsa programs is that you don't want the government. everyone knows that amazon has all of your information. so does, you know, your online grocer who takes your food order every week. this is about the federal government having too much information and too much control over their lives. >> like they don't have it already. >> as a stout nra member, i'm upset to know they may know what i'm doing, how i'm doing, what i'm doing with i many guns.
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>> where you keep them in your east hampton cottage. >> east hampton, it's ammo city out there. >> yes, i just heard from someone, a concerned viewer that when we say guns, we're not talking about your biceps. >> oh, there you go. >> okay. talking of surveillance. government programs. >> we want to see them today. you have three hours for you to reveal your guns. >> no, no, no. >> this is marketing. marketing is for the consumer's needs. obviously there's a consumer need out there to see the biceps. so we will, as marketers, as journalists. yes, that will happen at 8:00. >> it won't. i promise you, it really won't happen. not while i'm sitting here. talking of government surveillance programs, we do have more revelation -- >> now he's going to take off the whole shirt. >> it's a dare. it's on. >> alex, i'm sorry.
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>> you're sitting in the big seat today. i want to see how you can read as as i start to disrobe. nobody will see me disrobe. >> donny, you disrobing would have no impact on me whatsoever. >> let's go. let's see what she can do. >> we have more revelations today about the nsa's controversial surveillance programs according to the "wall street journal." the agency has the ability to monitor up to 75% of all u.s. internet traffic, retaining written content in e-mails and filtering domestic phone calls made over the web. of course, that's more than we previously thought. meanwhile, nbc news reports the nsa still doesn't know exactly how much information edward snowden took from the agency, saying officials are, quote, overwhelmed why would trying to assess the damage. snowden's leaks have also raised a question of thousand media investigates and report observe the intelligence community. "the guardian's" glen greenwald
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spoke about that last night. >> all of the best reporting involves journalists having classified information, the warrantless eavesdropping program, that's what investigative journalism. and if you want to start criminalizing that, you're asking as a citizen to be kept ignorant and to have people in power to have no accountability or transparency. journalism is not a crime and it's not terrorism. >> he's right about that, but the comparison to the pentagon papers just seems different. there's definitely more motive, it seems, in this type of situation. but when it comes to glen greenwald and what he does, it seems that people now commonly refer to edward snowden as a whistle blower in the culture now, which is strange, because that's technically not the case. >> i don't know if people -- >> i see the reference all over the place right now. >> that's in the mainstream media. in the country at large, there's a more evenly divided debate
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between patriots who think he's a trader to his country or journalists or aggressives who oppose what he's revealed, who find him -- >> i don't think it's that evenly divided, is it? i think people are overwhelmingly opposed to what edward snowden did in the country. all the opinion polls after that suggested that people felt that he should be prosecuted, that he should stand trial, that he had broken the law, and we have seen, ever since the attacks of 9/11 that people are prepared to relinquish quite a lot of freedoms, even perhaps including this level of surveillance. >> i'm a progressive. go through my phone records. if i called yemen 50 times in the last two days -- >> they're already going through your phone records. we lack look at the big shiny object of edward snowden, what did he have access to as a contractor, but he had a security clearance as a contractor to be able to get all this information. so we're looking over here at edward snowden.
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in bluffdale, utah, they're building this ginormous place that's going to store all of our data. >> which is so confusing, because isn't data little? why do they need such a big -- like motorcades of data? this thing is a miracle and it's so little. why is it so big? is it pages? i'm so confused by this story. i feel like data is so small. >> like jumbo shrimp. >> like a cloud. >> right, isn't it all on like an apple cloud. >> it's going to be an empty room. i don't know what's in that room. >> i think the big story is what's going on in bluffdale, utah. what's going to be housed there, how they're going to be able to have access to all this information, they're going to be able to store it to use algorithms to figure out, what really is something that we should be looking at. it's not donny's phone records -- >> but if you're okay with donny's phone records, people would be okay with that.
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it's still the same thing. >> i think the question is still, okay, people trust the government generally to use this information in a way that is benign and protects our security. the question some people might have with it, what happens if the government is no longer benign and they still have access to all of our information. >> where is this -- where's darth vader. let's play this out. the argument goes back, what happens to an evil government and they're coming to take us away. how is that happening in our checks and balance government, we don't have clues this this country. give me a scenario where dr. evil or darth vader is in the white house? >> are you serious, a lot of liberals thought dick cheney was darth vader. and now that the shoe's on the other foot. >> guy -- >> -- think that obama is evil. >> and he has imaged the surveillance state that exceeds anything dick cheney could have dreamed up in his wildest, most exciting fantasies. >> he understands what the world -- >> he's succeeded -- >> are we just presumed guilty?
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and they scan us and keep track of us and keep up with us until we do slip up, we're all presumed guilty. >> you know the information is out there as soon as you log on to your computer, the cat's out of the bag. >> it's so disturbing. it's orwellian. i think not 100% people are fine with it. coming up on "morning joe," "the washington post's" kathleen parker will be here with her new op-ed on congressman steve king. also msnbc's joy-ann reid, jilian tett, and john densmore will be here too. first, here's bill karins and he has a check on this hot, humid, sticky weather here. >> it's not quite hot and humid. it's word, cat. it's supposed to be august. we're supposed to be like sweating as you go outside this time of year, but it's been so cool this summer, people are actually appreciating it and looking forward to these temperatures near 90 degrees. one thing that we are dealing,
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we're getting towards the crop season here in the midwest. it's been pretty dry lately. chicago's had a very dry july and august. all of a sudden, our crops are starting to stress a little bit in areas of iowa. that's where a lot of our corn comes from and the soybeans. there's a growing drought there in the central plains. the farmers are really hoping they get some rain here towards the end of our season. we'll have to watch that and maybe the prices too. yesterday was very hot. it was 99 in denver. it was a nice 88 in new york city and d.c. was nice. over the next five days, the rainfall not very impressive, either, in the midwest. maybe at most, an inch. looks like a very dry forecast. today, not many airport problems. isolated storms there in virginia and north carolina. and for the first time in a month, chicago and new york city have a chance of hitting 90 degrees. it's been one of those summers. you're watch "morning joe." we're withdrbrewed by starbucks. we're here at the university of colorado
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with master griller and pro-tailgater, matt connor who's secretly serving steaks from walmart. it's a steak over! dude, it's so good. it's juicy. it's nice and tender. only one in five steaks is good enough to be called walmart choice premium steak. all these steaks are from walmart. oh my gosh! top ten most tender steaks i've had. i'm going to start buying meat at walmart. walmart's prices are so low you could have steak at every game. it's 100% satisfaction guaranteed. try it.
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okay, welcome back. let's take a look at the morning papers. from our parade of papers. atlanta journal constitution. police in georgia have arrested a man they believe opened fire at an elementary school in the atlanta metro area. a 20-year-old, michael brandon hill, is accused of firing at least half dozen shots with an ak-47. police believe hill entered the school by slipping in behind someone who had access to the building's locked doors. the school has more than 800 students from pre-k to fifth grade. they were there, but there were no injuries reported. >> thank god. german intern working in london died after working for 72
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hours straight. friends of the student said he collapsed at his apartment after pulling three all-nighters in a work. scotland yard says they are treating the death as now suspicious. >> nonsuspicious, but i have to say the fact that he worked three nights in a row is pretty suspicious and bank of america says they'll try to -- >> common practice, it happens constantly with young kids in that -- >> sad story. >> drinking red bull and coffee. >> yeah. >> that's just the culture? >> absolutely. >> but let's not in any way start to assign a bank or anybody else -- >> no, no, not a bank, just the culture of investment banking. >> and it's the culture of the competitive nature for college kids now trying to get jobs. it is, you bust a gut to try to get these, even unpaid internships, maybe not pulling three all-nighters. the "new york daily news."
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dr. oz came to the rescue of a 23-year-old british tourist. the tourist was sitting near a fountain outside of this building, rockefeller center, when a taxi cab jumped the curb, trying to run down a bicyclist in what witnesses say was a foot of road rage. dr. oz heard the crash and went to the scene to assist the victim along with other first responders. reports say she lost part of one leg. apparently there was a plumber there, he used his belt as a tourniquet and that helped save her life. >> what they didn't show was dr. oz and cory booker fighting to get on the scene. currently, seven in ten students receive some type of financial aid with college tuition rates up 250% over the past 30 years. the biggest increase in aid comes from federal government. last year, 57% of students received some type of federal aid. i remember my freshman year at the university of pennsylvania
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$1,900 from tuition. and fast food chain sonic is taking school spirit to a new level, by stamping college team logos on their hamburger buns. it does not look good. sonic hopes this move will inspire excitement and boost dwindling sales. made with tapioca, starch, and food coloring, the logos will be steamed on to buns from wax paper. the feature will raise prices as much as 10% -- 10 cents as the chain has to pay licensing fees to participating universities. >> is that healthy? >> really? >> assuming that's healthy, that's a huge breakthrough to be honest with you. you are now kind of -- cold branding food. >> donny sees it as a business model. >> you can have disney characters. if that happens with food, you have kraft slices, kraft vel e teeta. >> doesn't that just look like it has the packaging on it still? >> it looks delicious.
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>> it's 6:30 in the morning. it does not. okay, "washington post," crime novelist elmore leonard died in michigan at his home due to complications from a stroke. many of his novels became movies, including "out of sight," featuring george clooney. his work inspired the f/x series, "justified." elmore leonard was a great writer. anything other than "get shorty." >> look at me. joining me now, john harris. politico has a new piece this morning entitled "scott walker stealth 2016 strategy." so i guess he's got his own little playbook here, doesn't he? >> well, yes. our own james holman, he's the one who's telling it the way it is, the line from "get shorty," i love that movie too. wisconsin has been an interesting petri dish of national politics during the walker years because of his very
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high-profile battles with employee unions. what's clear is, without being in the top tier of speculation, the way marco rubio is, scott walker clearly has his eyes set on 2016. in new jersey, christie tries to establish himself by wrapping up a huge re-election victory next year. looks like walker is on a different path. he's not going to moderate his positions in any way, even though he's very much in a purple state. he's going to really try to bolster his conservative bona fides, and probably just eke out a re-election victory, and see where that leaves him. assuming he wins, most people think he will win, even though it's close, see where that leaves him on a 2016 stage. >> you know, nicole, when he was here the other day, your thoughts on his viability. >> scott walker? >> yeah. >> he is, i would put him in the top tier, john. he is absolutely on that short list that republicans talk about when we talk about who we want to see run.
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>> the top tier in terms of plausibility, but in terms of our own business and who we speculate on and there's all this fever. >> which you know, i'm not going to hurt your feelings by saying this, which is totally relevant to who republicans end up nominating. >> so republicans, when they talk amongst themselves, absolutely have scott walker in the top tier of candidates and potential nominees for 2016. they've admired him through his ups and downs. and i think he sort of earned more national recognition when he survived the recall. and publicly, he did something really interesting, not just for a politician, he acknowledged having made mistakes, talk about how he would have done things differently. that's very appealing, not just for us, having seen a politician who grows from his experience, was very important. >> be a human at the same time. john, i want to get your take on some of the recent comments by congressman bob goodlot, suggesting this compromise on
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immigration reform might be a lot further off than we thought. >> i was puzzled by this. he said that for children of undocumented immigrants, that he does not foresee a pathway to citizenship, a pathway to legalization. this was odd, because goodlot's been seen as instrumental this trying to get a passion through the house. he took a position to the right of even eric cantor. goodlot said, no, i have trouble seeing that. this was at a town hall here in virginia the other day. not clear what that leaves us, but it's not a great sign when someone who's most eager to get an immigration package through the house is really sending maybe not a red light, but definitely a yellow light, as he did there. >> john harris from politico, thank you. coming up next on "morning joe," white house finally gets around honoring the undefeated 1972
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dolphins. we'll show you why president obama couldn't stop talking about the chicago bears, though. and it was a rough one last night for deblasio. sox lose, the yankees win twice. highlights in sports. with angie's list, i save time, money, and i avoid frustration. you'll find reviews on home repair to healthcare, written by people just like you. find out why more than two million members count on angie's list. angie's list -- reviews you can trust. i put in the hourswhere i am today by luck. and built a strong reputation in the industry. i set goals and worked hard to meet them. i've made my success happen. so when it comes to my investments, i'm supposed to just hand it over to a broker and back away?
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sports, your daily a-rod update. red sox pitcher ryan dempster faces a five-game suspension for hitting inting alex rodriguez. mean, giardi was fined for that, for arguing with the umpire. and the woman who calls herself the former mistress of brian cashman says she has some juicy information about him. "usa today" reports that cashman told her he intentionally misled federal investigators during the roderick clemens investigation. she also says he knew of front house steroid use by various yankee players and didn't mind, as long as nothing came back to the organization. cashman has yet to comment. >> he said to his mistress, i purposefully -- >> former mistress. >> -- i "purposefully misled."
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>> got to be careful with former mistress. >> let's have different leads. the juiced jocks and the regular jokes. >> i can't stand -- he will go down as the most loathed, other than lance armstrong, in sports history. this guy is so delusional, so detached, and any yankee fan that cheers this guy at this point -- >> i don't think many are cheering him, but isn't the whole sport now maligned, because it's not just a-rod. all these guys are doing. >> i also say it's the same thing. and brian, you cover wall street. what percentage of guys, if you said to them, you're traders. you can take a pill and maybe not be caught and make 25% more this year. i think there's a cheating culture in a lot of places. >> people cheat because they -- >> it's a shortcut culture. >> they want to make the money. >> every team in baseball have someone on it that's doing steroids? >> first of all, steroids are not -- hgh has been part of the baseball culture since they
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started. there's always someone looking for an edge and who will bend or break the rules to do that. i think that's a fact of pro sports in america. >> the more money there is, the more incentive there is. >> that's the difference between now and 60 years. blue jays and yankees, robinson cano, a three-one shot. that's his 200th of his career. but bottom of the sixth, yankees still down by one. chris stewart, who ever heard of this guy at the beginning of the year, three-run shot. yankees take game one, 8-4. night cap, bottom of the night, game tied the at two. jason knicks at the plate. and they could be on a roll as they get the sweep and they do. that is a walk off win. this is the least dramatic walk off you will see. san francisco, giants/red sox, tied at two, bottom of the ninth, he walks in the winning run. what do you do when you swr
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celebrate that, donny? >> a "w" is a "w." >> dodgers' rookie sensation was held out of the lineup, showed up late, got fined. he did get into the game in the sixth and in the eighth, he did that. game tied at four, the go ahead solo shot to center. >> okay, okay, even i can see that was good. this is a game i've struggled in my 17 years in the states and failed to understand, but even i can see that is good. >> the cricket headlines are coming up. >> it was a four-game test match. it just got over in pakistan. braves and mets, a couple of jets here. i like defense in baseball. bottom of the second, juan lagades to the right. and brian mccann slices a liner to left. eric young, full extension, any
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good highlight, any good sports producer shows it a second time. the mets go on to win 5-3. a little bit of an oddball play in kc last night. royals catcher salvador peres let's the ball go behind him and the ball literally disappears into the home plate advertisement. goes right in there. the runners advance and a run scores. the white sox end up winning the game 2-0, but i think they should have stopped everybody, it's nobody's fault the ball got lost. >> they let the players go around? >> they let them advance one base. >> i think it's a do-over. >> if it within the in the stands, they would have advance a base. >> i agree with tom. >> you do. >> okay, name three baseball players? name one baseball player. >> a-rod, i knew that one. huh? okay. let's talk football. soccer. really football. >> actually, we're going to talk about --
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>> soccer is not football. soccer is a sport that kids play and they use their hands. >> and use their hands to bash other people's heads. >> what kind of sport doesn't use their hands. more than 40 years after they won the championship, the only undefeated team in nfl history made it to the white house. the '72 miami dolphins presented president obama with an autographed jersey. the team led by hall of fame don shula, with a walker, kind of sad to see, larry little, larry zoneka. they went 72-0 in the '72/'73 season, but the president says he has some mixed feelings because he's a bears fan. the bears lost once in their nearly perfect season. it happened to be the dolphins. >> this is something that we hope you find a good spot for, somewhere in your office or in -- where you can look at it and think about the whipping
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that we put on them. >> the president congratulated players and joked that he was only hosting the event so he could be the youngest guy in the room. >> i'm curious if this is just a guy thing. i think we see our own mortality as we see our sports stars age. i don't think it's a male thing -- >> plus, i haven't seen him in ten years, so the change is dramatic. >> when you see a running back or a baseball player, you remember, it wasn't that long ago, and you think, wow. we see our own lives ages as we see our sports heroes age. >> philosophy on a wednesday morning from donny deutsch. still ahead on "morning joe," before bob costas and frank gifford, there was marvey getman. how one jewish american athlete went on to become one of the greatest sportscasters in
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history. we'll talk to the director of the new hbo documentary, "glickman." and up next, the must-read morning papers. you're watch "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. i think she tried to kill us. [ sighs ]
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[ female announcer ] only aveeno daily moisturizing lotion has an active naturals oat formula that creates a moisture reserve so skin can replenish itself. aveeno® naturally beautiful results. welcome back to "morning joe." a beautiful look of the white house there on this wednesday morning. time now for the must-read editorials. john bolton writes in the "wall street journal," the u.s. should back the army in egypt. we need not dwell on the islamist ideology to grasp its authoritarian nature. it desires confrontation with egypt's military, because it rejects the legitimacy of any government it does not control. the brotherhood, therefore, shares full blame for the continuing carnage. should it ever regain power, whether through free elections
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or otherwise, it will never let go, as mohamed morsi was busy demonstrating in his year as president. opposing the brotherhood are egypt's military and a collection of citizens who refuse to live under an authoritarian theocracy. coptic christians, pro-democracy intellectuals, a middle class that desires for a functioning economy, and women who dot yearn for the burka. without the military's support, however, the group would be hopelessly outmatched. today's struggle is ultimately between the brotherhood and the army. like it or not, it is time for the u.s. to choose sides. for those who know american foreign policy on this issue, don't choose yet. you don't know how this is going to shake out, and keeping options open for the white house at the moment may be the most sensible course of action, despite the kind of carnage that we're seeing. but i actually agree that there are a lot of egyptians, a surprising number of egyptians, and people that i'm speaking to in egypt, who we would think of
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as liberal seculars, who are supporting what the military is doing with the brotherhood at the moment. >> well, as are all of our allies in the region. this is a position that saudi arabia has taken publicly and privately, israel, most of europe. so i think john bolton, while in some debates, he's, you know, advocating a side that's either distinctly american or sort of an extreme, in this case, he's standing with all of america's allies, who have already chosen a side in this debate. and we were talking yesterday about what james baker would do, sort of feeling nostalgic for the leadership of a james baker. i think most people on the outside, and granted, we don't have all the information or all the different choices to make as white house officials do in an hour like this. but i think a lot of people are eager to see america take a side. >> although i would think you found it pretty ironic to hear john bolton defending democracy to say it's actually time to stand up for the military.
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>> john bolton kept his diplomatic skills a well-kept secret for most in the media. but i think he was viewed as a force for good and did a lot more diplomacy than anyone else on the national security team. >> and a lot happening on egypt. and we'll be watching that, because there'll be more of these protests with the brotherhood, saying they want more country-wide demonstrations throughout egypt. >> coming up, founding member of the dooris, jim densmore will be here. and up next, nbc holds auditions for the sunday night football theme song. who got left on the cutting floor. next, we'll be right back. it's time to go. no. honey, it's too perfect. over a quarter million properties... you'll never want to leave. booking.com booking.yeah rebecca: whe
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congestion, for the smog. but there are a lot of people that do ride the bus. and now that the buses are running on natural gas, they don't throw out as much pollution into the air. so i feel good. i feel like i'm doing my part to help out the environment.
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here we go, everybody. you know what it's time for. news you can't use. we begin with one of the most epic college welcome speeches ever seen. watch as this georgia tech sophomore, nick shelby, welcomes freshman to school like it has never been done before. >> our mission as students is not to follow in the footsteps of the astronauts, nobel prize laureates and presidents who graduated before us, but to exceed their footsteps, crush the shoulders of the giants upon whom we stand. we here are all such innovative people, so i am telling you, if you want to change the world, you're at georgia tech. you can do that! if you want to build the ironman suit, you're at georgia tech,
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you can do that! if you want to play theme music during your convocation speech like a badass, we're at georgia tech, we can do that! i am doing that! ♪ >> like revenge of the nerds and then like the slow clap at the end. and everybody like, yeah, that's the best speech. >> a young joe scarborough. i just was feeling that. i just felt -- >> he looked like he was having a great time. >> he had a great time, he had the music down, stopped for the beats really good. speaking of music, carrie underwood will take over theme song duties for faith hill on sunday night football, but they did have auditions, so take a peak. >> sunday night football theme song audition. >> i'm heidi and i'm here for the audition.
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♪ all right, sunday night ♪ where are you >>♪ hey, jack, it's a fact ♪ the show's back in town ♪ it all gets nasty when these two get down ♪ ♪ it's every fan's right [ phone ringing ] ♪ it's more than a game, it's every fan's right ♪ ♪ it's why we're all waiting for a sunday -- ♪ hey, hey! >> it's the nfl rock song! ♪ n-b-c boom. >> whoo, that was good. >> yeah, yeah. thank you very much! cleveland! yeah, yeah! >> one, two, three! how was that? ♪ because the nfl rocks on nbc >> and because my lasik is slipping, i thought joe didn't
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have pants on. it was that salmon color. the nantucket red. >> the first time joe and mika was on, mika was doing this little shimmy behind him. >> she has moves. mika has got moves. >> we know she's got journalistic chops, but there was a whole thing going on. >> yeah. >> i'm not going there. >> okay. coming up next, the grio's joy-ann reid is here along with "the washington post's" kathleen parker. plus, the nra is against a national gun registry, but they may be keeping one of their own. we'll break down the new reflation. more "morning joe" in just a moment. it's back to school time and we're talking with diane about the walmart low price guarantee, backed by ad match. you got your list? let's go! look at that price! i like that! they need those for school. wow! that's the walmart low price guarantee backed by ad match. save time and money getting your kids ready for school bring in ads from your local stores and see for yourself.
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we have a simulation from cbs news now. this is a dick van dyke on the hollywood freeway in los angeles, california, with his car catching fire. take a look at this from cbs news, simulation. ♪ he's okay. >> okay, that's just -- >> for those in their audience under the age of 60, that is the dick van dyke theme song. can any of us name the supporting players in the dick van dyke show, besides mary
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tyler moore. >> why did you take that away? >> that's the obvious one. >> please. you don't know the other two? rose marie. >> he falls over the ottoman. >> welcome back to "morning joe." i'm katty kay along with donny deutsch. mika and joe have the morning off. joining us on set, joy-ann reid. and in washington, kathleen parker. kathleen, good morning. >> hey, good morning. i'm fired up and ready to go to georgia tech. >> in your capri pants, right? >> yeah. she's got the glasses for it and she's chosen the theme music. let's get to the news. the fight for control of the federal government, both in next year's midterm elections and in 1016 is beginning to take shape around a repeal of, yes, obama
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care. last night at a heritage foundation defund obama care event in texas, senator ted cruz tried to rally conservatives. >> what happens next is president obama and harry reid are going to scream and yell those mean, nasty republicans are threatening to shut down the federal government. what has to happen after that is we've got to do something that conservatives haven't done in a long time. we've got to stand up and win the argument. why is it that every reporter in the media and a significant percentage of republicans assume with an impasse that president obama will never, ever, ever give up his principles, so republicans have to give up theirs.
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if you have an impasse, you want to know, one side or the other has to blink. how do we win this fight? don't blink! >> ted cruz is starting to make something of a habit of attacking his own party at the moment. and earlier, former u.s. senator jim demint and president of the heritage foundation said any congressional republicans who oppose their effort, quote, should be replaced. the debate over how to defeat the affordable care act has put a target on several republicans up for re-election next year, including senate minority leader mitch mcconnell. >> in american slang, the chicken represents a coward. the chicken is also representative of a new breed of republicans in washington. take senate minority leader, mitch mcconnell. on the issue of obama care, he says -- >> this law is a disaster. and i want you to know, we're not backing down from this fight. >> but when he has the chance to defund obama care, some say he is chickening out. senator mcconnell, conservatives don't need a chicken when it
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comes to obama care. leaders lead. but if you fund it, you own it. >> joy, there's a philosophy in marketing advertising that you don't insult the audience. the audience is your next-door neighbor, your mother, your brother. as opposed to an ad like that, which goes to basically a 4-year-old child, nah nah, nah nah, poo poo mentality. if you don't agree with me, you're a chicken. talk about lowest common denominat denominator. >> it would be funny, except that republicans like mitch mcconnell, look at what happened with a dick lugar. someone that was set aside by the party as someone not conservative enough. jeb bush was being called a rhino because he was open to the possibility of immigration reform. and he's very conservative, i can attest, when he was governor of florida. so i think that republicans at the moment are kind of captive
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to the nah nah, nah nah boo-boo faction. because jim demint pioneered this idea. he had to accept rand paul to be the senate candidate from his home state. now he has to ally with him just to stay alive. that is so ascendant, there's really nowhere else to go. what is the principle mathey're fighting for. i see ted cruz saying, be tough, don't be a chicken, but the the principle -- >> the principle is no. >> i don't understand it. >> the principle is really purity, right? and political purity. kathleen, i wanted to ask you this. you have at the moment a series of what seem to be like litmus tests in the republican party. if you don't move to defund obama care, you should be primaried. if you vote for immigration reform and a path to citizenship, you should be primaried. if you vote to expand gun control and background checks, you should be primaried. is that useful for the party, to try and install these limits on
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what members can do and can't do? >> -- going on for a long time, in different arenas. for a long time, the lit must test had to do with social issues, and now those have been pushed aside in favor of these others. these are all, obviously, you know, the things that obama wants to accomplish in his term. they are-t contrary to a lot of the principles that the party has held true to. but essentially, it's a struggle within the republican party itself. essentially, this is like, it's like egypt, a microcosm. you've got these two forces within this one group, trying to figure out who will emerge victorious and who will be able to redefine the party. that's really what this is, is a contest to redefine the republican party, as represented by a ted cruz or a paul -- a rand paul. all of, what we're watching, really, is 2016 presidential politics and microcosm. is it helpful to the party?
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heck, no. heck, no. it's going to continue to cause internal ruptures. all of these things, you know, there are enough republicans who do want immigration reform, who do know that they're not probably going to defund obama care. but rather than reform obama care, rather than tweak it to make it workable, in their view, or at least to reach a compromise, they would rather kill it than reform it. and to reform is to -- as you say, katty, it's to fail the purity test. i don't think it's helpful in the long run and i don't think it's helpful in the short run, but it does get the base inspired and we'll see which of these candidates is most convincing. that's really what we're talking about. >> and it seems like what's old is new again, as kathleen points out, trying to redefine the republican party, the old standby is to delegitimatize the president. pete winter writes, what's troubling, because it's more revealing, is that senator cruz, rather than challenging the premise of his question,
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pandered to the audience member. a more responsible, genuinely conservative lawmaker would have answered the question asked of him by saying something like this. impeachment requires an impeachable offense. the president has done many things i disagree, but that doesn't mean he has done anything impeachment. he is the elected president and i'm an elected senator. we each have to fight for what we believe and let voters decide how we're doing. impeachment is not a political weapon. it seems like someone needs to be the grown-up in the room, nicole. you worked with john mccain who got to be a grown-up a lot, when he was facing off against people who would talk badly against then senator obama. where the grown-ups nowadays? >> the point that pete makes that is so important for all republicans on the national stage is we can be as tough as we want, but do it with intellectual honesty. that's the test that some republicans are failing. the test that ted cruz is failing isn't toughness, isn't conservatism, it's honesty. and it is an intellectually
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dishonest argument to say if you're not for defunding obama care, you're a wuss. because it's not going to happen. and having these fights on terrain that is favorable, having fights that we can win, is the most important lit must test for republicans to pass. and you can't win the fight of defunding obama care. >> defunding obama care means shutting down the government. >> right. it's not going to happen. >> and that's solely not going to happen. we've been down this road before, we know what it's done to our credit ratings, as we got downgraded before, first time in our history. why do we need to go down that road once more? it's not a winnable way to go? >> look, we're all talking about it. there are other objectives in politics. and sometimes the objective is to be -- if you're vilified by the mainstream media, all of us, you are celebrated on the right. so there is a crass political strategy to what some of these guys are doing. some people like rand paul really believe in what he's doing. but republicans are picking fights for a variety of motives.
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and not all of them are rebuilding the republican party. >> totally off the fight -- totally -- i've never seen a more -- i think a lot of people are angry. the problem isn't just the -- >> democrats don't run angry. >> i agree with you. and you don't capture the imagination and don't win the debate over the future by being angry. but these guys are not just trag to solve problems. that's their biggest problem. they're not interested in governing. >> it's the job of talk radio. it's the job of talk radio to provoke and tell the audience, you know what, you're right. but it's the job of politicians to say, this is what's possible. and you've merged those two functions now. in a lot of ways, ted cruz is a great talk radio host. he's doing what rush limbaugh does. he's saying, you're right, you hate obama care? i hate obama care. you're right. but he's not explaining to them what is possible and what could be done. and it used to be the job of really crafty and really good dealmakers like mitch mcconnell that could shepherd real legislation through by finding
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compromise that was acceptable to the base. they don't even do that anymore was they're afraid of the talk radio guys. >> it's an honesty issue and a question of going to your voters and saying, you might like this, but these are the reasons why shutting down the american government is not actually going to win us the next election. let's talk like grown-ups about this and see how we can try to reform what we have at the moment, because this is going to be the law of the land. okay, after spending months and millions of dollars campaigning against a national gun registry, it turns out the nra has one of its own. speaking, perhaps, about dishonesty here. a new story from buzzfeed reveals that the nra compiled information on tens of millions of gun owners without their consent. the database has been built through years of acquiring gun permit registration lists from state and county offices. gathering names of new owners from the thousands of gun safety classes taught by nra instructors and by buying lists of attendees of gun shows. an nra spokesman dreclined to
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discuss the group's name-gathering business. but when asked by buzzfeed, he said, that's none of your business. >> kathleen, it's donny. i in the previous segment was very upset, because knowing that someone knows where my guns are and they have a list and is composing it, i felt avery infringed and i'm nervous they're coming for my guns. >> well, donny, hide them. >> obviously, kathleen, this is marketing 101. there's nothing by anywhere that is not registered. having said that, there is this ridiculous irony here. >> well, it is ironic. but those people who are members of the nra would figure, well, i know where they stand, they're on my team. they're not going to come take my guns away from me. but the fact is, in the nsa to the nra, any agency that has any kind of impact on us, i've given up the idea that anything i do
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is confidential. every time i walk anywhere on the internet, i'm thinking, okay, do i mind if anyone knows that i'm shopping on this internet site, because that's the most offensive thing i do, is probably shop. >> come on, come on! kathleen, that just, that is not true -- >> it's embarrassing how much i do that, though. >> we'll talk off-camera. >> there is a kind of difference, a slight schizophrenia here. on the one hand, people who were so opposed to the idea that the government should have a record of who owns which guns and a register of who owns which guns, they hated that idea and hated the idea of big government there. but when it comes to big government watching our e-mails or listening to our telephone calls, there's a huge amount of latitude for that and tolerance for that. the opposition of government being involved in our lives is not uniform in this country. >> and the tolerance. i'm sorry. >> no, and of course, there's the irony that the plain reading of the second amendment says a well-ordered militia, which
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implies that the government would be involved in creating that order. i don't know if it's schizophrenia, because i think probably nra people would say, it's different than a private organization or semi-private organization is collecting these records. google is collecting information about -- >> i meant specifically about the government having a registry. >> they're probably okay with that. >> people are not totally consistent on their opposition to government being involved in their lives. >> and by the way, the nra's solution to the gun violence program, they wanted to create a national registry of people with mental illness. they're not against all registries, just against registri registries involving them. >> more of a do as i say, don't do as i do approach. and i agree with donny, this is just business 101. they're just trying to keep the marketing reference, which is our target audience. how do we keep them involved. especially now that we've had instances, since newtown, where they've needed to start to drum up those people, get support from their base of who the people are, who want to be committed to their positions. it's just marketing.
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>> nobody wants to tweet the nra more than me. but they are in the business of selling stuff. and there's nobody that is not selling stuff that is not targeting people. it is what it is. >> kathleen, i wanted to talk to you about your new best friend, steve king. >> before we do that, may i interject one little thought on the data thing. i think that, you say that people are more tolerant of the data collection of the government, having to do with nsa and telephones and internet and so on. i think if it were a republican president, george w. bush doing these things rather than the obama presidency, i think you would have a much different reaction, just saying. >> but bush was doing it. the thing is -- >> bush was not doing it -- >> the prison program actually started under the bush administration. it was continued -- >> this was our fantasy. we never -- >> curt has been writing about this since the bush administration. >> we never came close to realizing the surveillance state that obama has. and i applaud him for it. >> this is a 10-year-old
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program. >> you know, good for him. but i'm just saying. there would be impeachment hearings underway if bush and cheney were doing the sort of data collection. >> but they were, and there weren't impeachment hearings. these are ten-year-old programs. >> i think it's since 9/11, there's been a lot more tolerance. the government doing what it takes from republicans and from democrats, and saying we will give up a certain amount of our own freedoms in order to ensure our safety. >> a liberal upper east side and stop everybody and they will say exactly -- >> and let's remember, the foreign intelligence, the fisa upgrade, the fisa act was passed actually in 2007 under a democratic congress and with george w. bush still in the white house. barack obama was not president in 2007. the first revelations about the nsa 215 section being used were in 2006 in "the new york times." the reaction of a democratic congress was to pass the fisa act, whose 215 section is being
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used right now by the nsa. this happened under george w. bush. >> listen, i worked in the white house -- >> there were no impeachment hearings. >> it was part of the effort to keep some of our methods secret. because once they're in "the new york times," they're not as helpful or useful. which is why i think president obama has done the lord's work in improving and enhancing vastly, vastly augments the surveillance state in which we live. and i applaud it. i think that's one of the things he's done that's kept us safer. >> i don't think this is a republican/democrat issue, i think it's an american issue. i hope the people have prepared for this. >> i hope so. >> one little thing, and this speaks to what nicole was saying, something they dreamed about. in a conversation i had with president bush about these, the infrastructure he put in place for surveillance and such, he said, i fought these hard battles and people don't like it now, but my successor is going to be grateful, because he's going to need it. so here we are. i think he fully expected that we would be where we are.
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>> kathleen, let's talk about steve king. in your latest column, you take on the iowa republican congressman. the piece is titled steve king's inhuman farm bill measure. you write, in part, a handful of animal rights advocates have been dpglued to the farm bill, which, you'll recall, became controversial when house republicans severed a fad stamp provision that customarily has been attached to the measure, but you may have escaped much notice. but it would preempt state and local laws governing food production and other animal-related industries, including puppy mills, confinement of farm animals, animal fighting, shark finning, and the sale of meat from horses, dogs and cats. does he really think that dog fighting is fine? >> yes, he fought measures to restrict dog fighting and he thought it was just, you know, an issue of parental autonomy,
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whether children could watchdog fights. and he even extrapolated the dog fighting from human fighting. we have people who enter boxing rings and wrestling matches and such. he said, if we allow that, why not dog fighting? he did try to back off a little bit, but he more or less made things worse. yes, he thinks dog fighting should be allowed and of course, you know, that doesn't help his stature among people who are interested in animal rights, when it comes to other sort of less-controversial issues. the latest -- the amendment to the farm bill has to do with his desire to sort of eliminate the patchwork of laws and regulations that vary state to state and sometimes, you know, locally, community to community. and i get that, you know, that sounds reasonable and rational, but states don't feel that way. they've worked hard to have their own standards imposed on how animals are raised, how they're confined, and trying, you know, obviously through the lobbying efforts of animal rights organizations, to try to
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make factory farming at least as humane as possible. but this amendment, should it pass, would undo all of that and even, you know, one of the little sticking points for representative king is that when you have a certain set of standards in california, for example, when it comes to raising chickens and hen -- egg-laying hens, they want a certain sized cage so the hens can stand up and stretch their wing and just have a reasonably unmiserable life. but those restrictions would be imposed on eggs elsewhere, raised elsewhere. in other words, if you want to sell your eggs in california, you have to treat your chickens the way we think they should be treated p ed treated. >> he's a warm and fuzzy guy. >> kathleen parker, thanks very much. you can read kathleen's columns on the washingtonpost.com. still ahead on "morning joe," he was denied a chance at
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his olympic dream during hitler's 1936 berlin games, but marty glickman went on to become one of the greatest sportscasters in history. john friedman joins us, coming up. and up next, larry summers is facing more backlash as a possible pick to lead the fed, with one senator saying he wouldn't have summers, quote, mow his lawn. we'll talk about that and more with the "financial times'" gillian tett. you're watching "morning joe," brewed by starbucks. right now, 7 years of music is being streamed. a quarter million tweeters are tweeting. and 900 million dollars are changing hands online. that's why hp built a new kind of server. one that's 80% smaller. uses 89% less energy. and costs 77% less. it's called hp moonshot. and it's giving the internet the room it needs to grow. this&is gonna be big.
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. welcome back to "morning joe." and here with us on set, assistant editor and columnist for the "financial times," gillian tett. gillian, great to be together on the set this morning. >> before we get into, there's a 40% maximum brit quota as far as -- t.j., alex.
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>> it's in the -- face it -- >> let's not talk about guns with donny. >> but we do have a -- the women outweighing the men too. >> that's a good thing. >> 60% -- >> outweigh the men. >> well, that's terrific. >> talking of women and men, larry summers always comes up, doesn't he, brian? isn't he the first thing that comes to mind. >> the next head of the fed is fascinating to me, because janet yellen is the pick that a lot of people should get it, and is the philosophical progression of ben bernanke and a lot of people feel that they should at least complete the circle to see how the whole thing should work. and larry summers comes in here and the name's being bandied about. who knows why, who knows how it's coming from, and who knows how viable it is. so that's the question. >> absolutely. who thought that central banking could become so exciting, like a soap opera. >> you have here, janet yellen,
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this grandmotherly figure, the way she runs things, who is quite an independent character in terms of her views, and is willing to stand up on issues like unemployment and say that's really the key issue that we should be worrying about today, versus someone like summers, who has been part of the white house a long time, who is regarded as much more part of the obama team, who has been much more willing to work with wall street and regulation. that's kind of code for actually being rather lax towards the banks. these two characters pitted against each other. and it's absolutely fascinating to see how it unfolds right now. >> and we have senator pat roberts, the republican from kansas, who has now said that he's going to support yellin. as he says, i wouldn't want larry summers to mow my yard. i didn't think he was mowing the yard, i thought he was running the american economy. >> it means he would want to do, obviously, anything. and i think that's the key, to some people concerned, especially some of the conservatives, who knows what sort of right turn he might take
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with the approach to running the fed. >> well, one of the varying issues right now is to ask, what do we actually want from a fed chief? because until recently, everyone thought you had to be a brilliant economist and a brilliant leader, if you would like. i was actually trained as a cultural anthropologist, and identify been talking to some anthropologist recently, who have gone inside central banks and done some fascinating studies. and what they point out, these days, fed chief is to be a shaman or a preacher rather than an economist. the economy is not like a machine where you need the chief engineer to tinker with the dials precisely. you need someone who can guide policy with their words and their presence and build confidence and make us all believe in them and make our mood move in the way the fed chief actually wants that to move. so the question we should be asking is, does either yellen or some of us have that ability to inspire confidence and faith in all of us or not. >> so gillian, where are you putting your vote, if you had
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one, where would it go? >> well, we actually have been pretty cavalier about not putting our colors in at the moment. i have great admiration for summers, but i think that yellen has had a pretty impressive track record of leading things, in her role at the fed. >> will the paper endorse at some point? >> of course it will, yes. >> brian, the street is watching, how is it going to swing? >> i think a lot of people on wall street might be a little uneasy about both in some respects, but larry summers is polarizing figure. so i don't know that there's some like block here and block here. i think the sentiment on wall street is like, if you supported what ben bernanke did, and all that's in the stock market, she, even if she is an independent thinker, is the logical person to think if this whole grand experiment would work, where summers is a little less predictable and we're not really sure if he would sort of finish the job coming out of the
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financial crisis. >> as a behaviorist everything and you hear about summers would tell you, he's one of these guys that even if it's not broke, he's going to break it, which is scary. because there's a big -- >> he's the smartest guy in the room. >> that's a scary place to be -- >> would the cultural anthropologist think he has a good feel. >> the only big question right now, with the markets watching, when does a fed actually start tapering. when do they start rolling back this purchase of securities to try to keep monetary policy loose? and what we do know about summers, actually he is rather more cynical about the impact of this quantitative easing than yellen. and the fact that there's even a chance he could be appointed is already causing the bull markets to really start to worry. and you're seeing some fascinating global implication from that. just look at what's happened recently, say, in india. i mean, the viewers might say, okay, who cares about india in terms of our financial investments? india is going through right now a really big financial spasm and
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the currencies have fallen very sharply and the stock market's crashed, just because people think that maybe the fed is going to start rolling back its monetary policy very soon. and that's a really foretaste of what could come, if someone like summers does come in and actually give some big shots to the market in terms of policy. >> so combine that with debt ceiling negotiations, the possibility of a government shutdowns, elections, we're in for a very tricky autumn? >> we had a very frank summer, but there's an awful lot of big uncertainties on the horizon. >> and gillian's got an op-ed coming up in the "ft" on friday with this cultural anthropologist. >> we've got a little sexism test here and a british test here. are you a baseball fan? can you name three baseball players? >> i can talk to you about soccer or football -- >> this is cultural. >> it's a cultural, not sexual. >> can you name three baseball players? >> at least i can name one.
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>> that was better, right? >> we just talked about him -- >> i know. that's because i have reasonable short-term memory. gillian tett, thanks very much for coming in. coming up, a new climate change report has sea levels rising by three feet by the end of the century. now some think it's too late to reverse course. ann curry visits a place being hardest hit, that's the arctic. our report, next, we'll be right back. [ shapiro ] at legalzoom, you can take care of virtually all your important legal matters in just minutes. protect your family... and launch your dreams. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. athto fight chronic.ms. osteoarthritis pain. to fight chronic low back pain. to take action. to take the next step. today, you will know you did something for your pain.
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welcome back to "morning joe." to a leaked report about the dangers of climate change and the impacts it's having on rising water levels around the world. nbc's ann curry has a firsthand look at arctic. >> at the top of the world, scientists like dr. jason box study the icy landscape. he says all of this might be lost to climate change, mostly caused by humans burning fossil fuels. >> there's no debate. it's really quite simple. we've overloaded the atmosphere with heat-trapping gases and the rest are just details. >> reporter: the new report from the intergovernmental panel on climate change seem to confirm what box and other scientists have been learning long before the draft was leaked. among the findings, the main cause of long-term warping is
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carbon dioxide emissions, that sea levels could rise about three feet by the end of this century. and that even if we stop producing carbon emissions now, climate change will persist for hundreds of years. hearing what's known as iceberg alley, box, who's been studying the arctic for 20 years, says the ice is now melting at a pace never seen before, affecting weather systems. >> so in ways that people don't fully yet realize, climate change has affected us in america and across the world. >> yeah. there are manifold ways that climate change is having impact. the arctic is a very useful bellwether of change and it's ringing. >> reporter: but greenland's in don't need a scientist to tell them about climate change. >> the sea ice is disappearing.
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>> arctic ice means his people struggle to reach traditional hunting grounds. some have fallen through the ice and have died. >> you're saying the way of life is so threatening, it could die. it could be lost forever. >> the only humans around the north pole in the arctic are us. we have been here for thousands of years. and we tell you, things are changing. and you will feel it, maybe tomorrow. >> amazing pictures. >> beautiful. the way of life that is changing. definitely. that was ann curry reporting. coming up next, the grandfather of modern sports casting before costas and mob, frank gifford and bill bradley, there was marty glickman. he's the subject of a new hbo documentary and we'll talk to writer and director, jim friedman, next. plus, it's the only game you'll see at fenway park where both team want to see the other side win. we'll explain why, ahead. [ female announcer ] did you know the average person smiles
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aveeno® naturally beautiful results. hello, there, everybody. i'm marty glickman. >> when i beat the world's record holder at 60 yards, i realized i had a chance to make the olympic teams. >> you can't think '36 olympics without thinking about the u.s. did to marty glickman. >> it was the first jock turned broadcaster in the history of of our media. >> he invented the vernacular. >> swish! >> marty invented the game into the consciousness of america. >> i would talk like him, i would walk like him. >> he had don something that really hadn't been done before and hasn't been done since. >> that was part of the new "glickman" documentary.
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jim friedman, incredible story. the flat bush flash. an amazing runner, a kid from brooklyn, who basically u.s. removed him from the olympic team in hitler's germany in '36, obviously, because he was a jew, replaced by jesse owen. >> marty was a legendary sportscaster in new york, did the knicks and the giants and t the jets. and if you grew up in the ladder part of the 20th century and were any part of a sports fan, marty glickman was the soundtrack of your life. but the story people don't really remember about him was that he was a world class athlete, a world class runner, the third fastest man in the world behind jesse owen and ralph metcalf in 1936 and he was part of the relay team with another jewish runner, sam stoler, and he was denied a chance to run, many people believe because we were appeasing adolf's germany.
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and black athletes, u.s. black athletes were dominating the games and the thought of two jews standing on the winning podium was too much for hitler. >> why did america appease hitler, as far as a jew versus a black. >> there are several theories. one of the coaches was one of the coaches was usc and put his own two runners in. another theory that had more validity is avery brundage, head of the u.s. olympic committee, later was proved to be a nazi sympathizer, was appeasing adolf hitler. and two years later when the nazis were building the facility in washington, d.c., they awarded it to brundage's ke company. >> so not just appeasement, but maybe literal payback? >> and marty never got a cans to run again, because in '40 and
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'42, there were no olympics. >> obviously he didn't come home and wallow in self-pity over this. but how did he feel about that experience. did he ever talk about it? what role did it play in his life? >> the film, to me, is what happens when an 18-year-old kid's dream are crushed by racism and prejudice. do they become bitter, or do they triumph? marty glickman not only triumphed, he used sports to transcend the divisions created by race, class, and religion. every four years, he'd be asked about the olympics, when the olympics went on, about that relay, and 50 years later, he returned to berlin, and walked on that track as part of a celebration of jesse owens' olympic victories. and all of this anger spewed out of him that he didn't know was inside him, that he'd been carrying around for 50 years, being so -- he was walking around the track cursing. this was not a man who cursed. so upset of what they did, not just to him, but how could they do that to any 18-year-old kid. >> jim, you were his radio
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producer when you were, what, too young -- >> many years ago, i was 17. it's a fun story. i used to drive into manhattan with my older brother who produced a show. one day i'm sitting in the booth and my brother told marty that he's been called up to the army reserves. marty needs to find another producer. without missing a beat, marty pointed directly into the booth and said, jimmy can do it. and i turned around, expecting to see another guy named jimmy sitting there. there wasn't. and he started to teach me how to get scores off the wire. is there still a wire? >> it's called the internet. >> schedule commercial screen calls, this is pretty heady stuff for a 17-year-old. but marty glickman never treated me as a 17-year-old high school kid. he treated me as his producer and it gave me a professional confidence i have until this day. >> jim, that was your big break. you got it right there from marty. has this been a passion product to have you see to come to
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fruition. >> it's an absolute dream come true. i -- the film played, the santa barbara film festival and the head of william morris dever called me up and asked to see the film. he said, you know who should see this film, martin scorsese. and two days later, i receive an e-mail from mr. scorsese saying he loved my film and wanted to release it through his company on hbo. you know, so pretty much a typical tuesday in my life. and he -- yeah, and it's airing monday night at 9:00 p.m. it's unbelievable. >> that's fantastic. >> larry king, i think, described his style as television on radio. >> yes. >> what was it that made him such a great -- how did he do it? >> well, it was not just the vibrancy and energy, it was a feeling that he imparted. he played the game, so he made you feel like he was a little kid and you were a little kid, listening. like the first time you have a
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catch with your father, it's almost primal. and what people don't realize about marty glickman is, he revolutionized radio basketball, play by play. all the expressions, many of them being used today, he coined. the key, the lane, the mid-court strike, swish. and he gave the listeners a geography of the court, before marty glickman, it would be smith passes to jones, he shoots, he scores. you didn't know where they were on the court. so with marty, it was smith dribbles up along the right sideline, throws a bounce pass to the top of the key, smith banks in a two-handed set shot. you saw the game. >> you talk about his passion. at the end of his career in new york, he was doing a lot of local stuff, that people would think a guy at his level would be beneath him. same passion, same energy. >> did it for 16 years, the high school game of the week. would bring out at halftime, the glee club and the debate team so people could see all the great things that kids were doing. >> sort of like the last generation, i don't know about you, thomas, but for me, i used to go to sleep at night listening to the radio, and in
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boston, it was johnny most. >> marty gave johnny most his job, his first job. >> and he would get so excited, his cigarette would start burning his lip. i'm on fire, i'm on fire! >> reporter: jim, great stuff. "glickman" appears on monday, august 26th, 9:00 p.m. that's hbo. still ahead on "morning joe," jim morrison on trial. why an original member of the rock band doors is stepping out to defend his friend's legacy. and next, the heroes of the boston bombing take the field at fenway. an emotional story from boston coming up, next. we had never used a contractor before and didn't know where to start. at angie's list, you'll find reviews on everything from home repair to healthcare written by people just like you. no company can pay to be on angie's list, so you can trust what you're reading. angie's list is like having thousands of close neighbors, where i can go ask for personal recommendations. that's the idea. before you have any work done, check angie's list.
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first responders four months ago when two bombs went off near the finish line of the finish line. bob riggs was just 60 feet away. >> it was complete carnage. it was very bloody. very sad. sad time. >> while the fans look up to sergeant bridge, his heroes, his opponents, the wounded warriors.
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>> if you asked them, they would say it was us. ask all of our guys, you said it was them. >> veteran s who lost limbs. >> rarely does fenway park play host to two teams who say their inspiration is their inspiration. but one thing they agree on, just how special playing at america's most beloved ballpark is. >> i wouldn't even put this on the bucket list. you know it's never going to happen. >> here you go, young man. >> sergeant first class todd reid lost his leg 20 years ago. a die-hard boston fan, he found the perfect place to show his spirit. >> you get back out there and live your life, similar to what you were living before, you have a few adjustments. >> this is a very special place. >> army sergeant matt kenzie stepped on a land mine and lost his foot. he hopes those who lost limbs in the boston bombings take knows notice. >> for them to see us out here playing on prosthetic devices at a high level and enjoying our
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lives, it helps them out and maybe cheers them up a little bit. >> during the game, he drove in four runners and drove home his message to third grader, sean mclaughlin. >> you can do a lot of stuff. >> in the end, a win for the visiting wounded warriors, but the home team fans still have plenty of reasons to cheer. >> everybody just stops and watches, when we watch these people and honor them in some way, right? >> these policemen, these fireman. you brought up that before 9/11, we didn't always give them the reverence that they should have. i mean, heroes and those victims, just amazing. they run into us. they keep going. >> and that little boy, you can imagine, doing a lot with that one leg. that's a metaphor. a lot of people should listen to. >> i didn't cry yesterday, was that stuff gets me a little close. up next, speaking of fenway
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park, why new york city's next mayor should be a red sox fan. the surprising admission from candidate bill deblasio. "morning joe" will be right back. it's back to school time and we're talking with maria about the walmart low price guarantee. you got your list? let's go. if you find a lower advertised price they'll match it at the register. really... yeah, in a "jif". you ready? what?! that's the walmart low price guarantee backed by ad match. bring in receipts from your local stores and see for yourself. [ female announcer ] only aveeno daily moisturizing lotion has an active naturals oat formula that creates a moisture reserve so skin can replenish itself. aveeno® naturally beautiful results. . [ male announcer ] julia child became a famous chef at age 51.
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picasso painted one of his master works at 56. doris taerbaum finished her first marathon at 50.
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not everyone peaks in their twenties. throughout their lives. passion keeps them realizing possibilities. an ally for real possibilities. aarp. find tools and support at aarp.org/possibilities. good morning, it is 8:00 a.m. on the east coast, 5:00 a.m. on the east coast.
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i'm kathy kay along with donny deutsch. joe and mika have the morning off. >> i think anthony weiner's got some problems. there i see bill de blasio, front-runner for mayor, life-long boston red sox fan, born in cambridge. nicolle wallace, you are a communications expert. do you stand tall? >> i tell you, politics 101, anyone that's ever been on a bus tour -- you've been on bus tours. >> just to follow bands. >> before you get off the bus, the last thing you ask your communications director is, who's the home team? what hats are they wearing? i mean, this is, you know, so fundamental to feeling like the person we might vote for is someone that cares about the same things i do and nothing unites people more than rooting for the same team. >> it's who he is. you can't deny it. so it's like there's a history
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there. if you were his opponent though, ad agency guy, wouldn't you start running ads up the flag pole? >> i would say, have some fun with it. cheer me on the streets. boo me at the stadium. almost kind of use it to your point as this is who i am. be the guy you boo at the stadium. have fun with it. if he moves sides, i mean, immediately, you've got no core there. walk right into it and say, my heart's in new york, my baseball hat's in boston. >> he says he'll celebrate any victory. what happens if there's a red sox victory and he has to celebrate that too? >> i would create a hat for him down the middle, ne new york/boston. have fun. at the end of the day, voters are smart. >> there's nothing wrong with being bi in baseball. >> bi in baseball. >> there we go, figured it out. >> it's like living in manchester and supporting liverpool, you can't do it. i think it's -- >> once again, stand tall, bi in
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baseball according to thomas roberts. >> i stand firm. >> let's get some news. this is real news of course. let's get some other real news. the fight for control of the federal government. both in next year's midterm elections and in 2016 is beginning to take shape around, yes, of course, the repeal of obama care. and last night at a heritage foundation defund obama care event in texas, senator ted cruz tried to rally conservatives. >> what happens next is president obama and harry reid are going to scream and yell those mean nasty republicans are threatening to shut down the federal government. what has to happen after that, is we've got to do something that conservatives haven't done in a long time. we've got to stand up and win the argument. why is it every reporter in
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america and significant republicans assume with an impasse that president obama will never give up his principles so republicans have to give up theirs? if you have an impasse, you want to know, one side or the other has to blink. how do we win this fight? don't blink. >> by the way, cruz was heckled at that event. earlier, though, former u.s. senator jim demint said any congressional republicans who oppose their effort, quote, should be replaced. the debate over how to defeat the affordable care act has put a target on several republicans up for re-election next year, including senate minority leader mitch mcconnell. >> in american slang, the chicken represents a coward. the chicken is also representative of a new breed of
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republicans in washington. take senate minority leader mitch mcconnell. open the issue of obama care, he says -- >> this law is a disaster. i want you to know we're not backing down from this fight. >> but when he has the chance to defund obama care, some say he is chickening out. senator mcconnell, conservatives don't need a chicken when it comes to obama care. leaders lead. but if you fund it, you own it. >> what an absolutely stupid ad. am i the only one -- i watch ted cruz up there and i kind of say, he is not getting the memo from christie as far as what's getting you elected going forward? this party of no, this anger, i'm strong, you're a chicken, i'm strong, you're a chicken. who is he talking to? it's so tone deaf. party of no. let's kill obama care. versus you watch what christie's doing. time after time, decision after decision, moderate, moderate, moderate. nicolle, am i missing something? >> it's not just christie. the problem with what cruz is
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doing, it's intellectual dishonest. there's a great piece on -- commentary website this morning written by pete wagner, who's a very thoughtful conservative. he was also asked at that event why don't we impeach president obama. and he said, because we don't have the votes. the true answer, intellectually honest answer, because he's he's not committed an impeachable offense. ted cruz is doing fearmongering and lying to the voters. presenting an untruthful case. the reason we're going to lose this debate about defunding obama care is because we don't occupy the white house. we don't have the ability to pass laws and then sign them. best way to win this fight is to elect a republican president. >> off of that point, we have an excerpt from commentary magazine about the dangers basically facing cruz. the author writes, what's troubling, because it's more revealing, is senator ted cruz, rather than challenging the premise of his questioner,
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pandered to the audience member. a more responsible lawmaker would have answered the question by saying something like this, impeachment requires an impeachable offense. the president has done many things i disagree with. that doesn't mean he has done anything impeachable. we each have to fight for what we believe and let voters devise how we're doing. impeachment is not a political weapon. the weapon is to lay the foundation brick by brick for running a successful national campaign. their opposition presents a different set of challenges. texas governor rick perry is reportedly negotiating with white house officials to accept $100 million available through the affordable care act to care for the elderly and disabled.
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perry has denounced the law of course. about 12,000 texans during the first year of the program. this of course he's now -- there are nine republican governors who have opposed the affordable care act but have said we quite like some of the provisions. it's kind of surprising from rick perry. he has been so vociferous about this charges of what's the word hypocrisy may be valid here. >> maybe he forgot he was against it. >> there was another thing i was opposed to. to me, the tone of going backwards, of no, of anger, of backwards, it's just that's not what -- how many times do these
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guys have to learn? >> we have to offer alternatives. we're talking about this relationship between primary politics and general election politics. it's not an electable approach. it might get him a lot of support and a lot of attention and maybe sell a lot of books at some point. >> let me debunk this notion that you have to be as crazy as you can be to win a primary. i mean, primary voters are the most passionate conservatives. the most passionate participants in elections. they want to win. they want to win national elections ultimately. a fraction of them are passing a purity test. a fraction of them, particularly in places like iowa, care a whole lot about social conservative agenda. the vast majority, particularly when you get to states like michigan and florida, they want to win the white house. >> if you got up on the stump and you said to voters, guys, my first objective is we need to
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win. okay. i hear what you're saying in terms of some of these more fringe issues and some of the far right we're not going to get there. come with me. i'll get us to where we need to get to. but you need to trust. like people can do math. people can figure it out. if you say to a republican, look, you have two choices. three choices. one is a far right person that's never going to be in the white house. two, is me that's going to get in the white house as a republican and really, really hear and listen to. or, three, we lose like always and a democrat's there. >> i don't think it's either/or. a lot of republicans like christie who really adhere to different swath, s of a truly conservative ideology while not forgetting their primary function is to govern. >> look at the argument if we basically shut down the government to defund obama care, the voters will turn on us.
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this will be a colossal disaster for the american economy, for the state of this country, the markets would panic. interest rates would rise. we would all feel it if government were shut down. >> we've been down that road. >> what happens with ads like this one, it's a stupid crazy ad. >> the notion that his campaign, they're not at least having to do something to respond to it is ridiculous. >> also, you know what i agree with you, i think it's this setting of litmus tests. if you decide you're not going to defund obama care, you should be primaried. if you vote in favor of immigration reform, you should be primaried. if you vote to expand background checks on gun control, you should be primaried. if you don't do these things, you're outside the tent. >> i think it's why a lot of people are watching chris christie very closely. he's, so far, hasn't done too many things that make anyone worried that he's governing in a
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way that is other than what he believes is right for the people. >> but back and forth on gun control. talking background checks after spending months and millions dollars campaigning against a national gun registry, it turns out the nra has one of its own. a new story from buzz feed reveals the nra compiled information on tens of millions of gun owners without their consent. the database has been built through years of acquiring gun permit registration lists from state and county offices. gathering names of new owners. and by buying lists of attendees of gun shows. an nra spokesman declined to discuss the methods. he said he was asked by -- he said he was asked by buzz feed, he replied, that's none of your business. >> i'm confused, that's an nra registry. did i miss something? >> but that's their business model. why not know who owns a gun in the country? so then you can solicit them to
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be a part of your group? isn't that a business -- >> isn't that un-american though? >> business, capitalism, how's that un-american? >> if you buy a car seat, you're in a registry. >> the central part of the nra's opposition of expanded -- >> the federal government possessing the right -- >> right if you're an nra member -- >> if you're a lot of people, you oppose -- >> -- your main fear is the government is breathing down your neck. >> the philosophical objection to all the nsa programs is you don't want the government -- everyone knows amazon has all your information. so does your online grocher who takes your food order every week. but this is about the federal government having too much information, too much control over their lives. >> have it already -- >> as a stout nra member, i'm upset to think they may know what i'm doing, where i'm buying my guns. it's very upsetting to me. >> right. >> where you keep them in your hamptons beach cottage?
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>> east hampton, it's ammo city out there, just crazy. >> yes, i just -- i just heard from someone, a concerned viewer, that when we say guns, we're not talking about your biceps. >> ah, there you go. >> now he's going to take off the whole shirt. >> it's a dare. it's on. >> i want you to -- >> alex, i'm sorry, i'm really sorry. >> -- broadcast chops, sitting in the big seat today, i want to see how you can read as i start to disrobe. >> can we get some music too? like something from "magic mike." >> nobody will see me disrobe. this is more a journalistic test. >> you disrobing will have no impact on me whatsoever. >> it's happening. let's see what she can do. >> we have more revelations today about the nsa's controversial surveillance programs. according to "the wall street journa journal", the agency has the ability to monitor up to 75% of all u.s. internet traffic, retaining written content in e-mails and filtering domestic phone calls made over the web. that's more than we previously thought. mean why, nbc news reports the
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nsa still doesn't know exactly how much information wasnowden took from the agency. saying officials are overwhelmed while trying to assess the damage. snowden's leaks have raised the question of how the media investigates and reports on the intelligence community. the guardian's glenn greenwald spoke about that last night. >> all of the best reporting over the last 40 years involves journalists having classified information. the pentagon papers. the bush torture site. cia black sites. that's what investigative journalism is. if you want to criminalize that, it means you're acting as a citizen to be kept ignorant and allow people in power to conceal what they're doing behind a wall of secrecy and to have no accountability or transparency. journalism is not a crime and it is not terrorism. >> he's right about that. the comparison of pentagon papers just seems different. there's definitely more motive it seems in this type of situation. but when it comes to greenwald,
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it seems people commonly refer to snowden as a whistleblower in the culture now. which is strange because technically that's not the case. >> i don't know if people -- >> i see it all over the place now. >> that's in the mainstream media. in the country at large, there's an evenly divided debate between patriots who think he's a traitor to his country and maybe journalists with, who oppose what he revealed, to -- >> i think people are overwhelmingly opposed to what edward snowed did in the country. opinion polls after that suggested people felt he should be prosecuted, he should stand trial. he had broken the law. we've seen ever since the attacks of 9/11 that people are prepared to relinquish quite a lot of predomes, freedom, even this leave of surveillance -- >> if i call yemen in the last
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50 days, take a look -- >> they're already going through phone records. we look at the big shiny object. what did he have access to as a contractor? not really with nsa, with booze allen. he had a security clearance to get this information. we're looking at edward snowden. if utah, they're building this ginormous place that's going to store all of our data. >> it's so confusing because isn't data little? why do they need such a big -- a mean, i don't know. i mean, why is it so big? i don't get it. like are they storing it, like -- i'm so confused by that story. because i feel like data's so small. >> kind of like jumbo shrimp. >> oxymoron. >> isn't it all like on an apple cloud? >> it's going to be an empty room to intimidate us. >> i think the big story is bluff dale, utah.
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the money being poured into what's being built there, what's going to be housed there, how they're going to be able to have access to all this information that they really already have access to. but they'll store it. to use algorithms to figure out what really is something we should be looking at. >> coming u on me ining up on " from the doors john densmore is here. first, here's bill karins. >> finally feels like summer. we're going to continue to watch this hot weather from the west to the east coast as we go throughout the day today. some of the warmest temperatures in nearly a month for new york city, washington, d.c. it's out west we have problems. the fires, one after the other. the big one, beaver creek in idaho. only 10% contained. it's like 128 square miles. kind of crazy stats. so the forecast for the firefighters today, nearly 2,000 of them on the ground.
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83 today. the winds will be light. hopefully, they can get more containment on that huge blaze. if you look at the drought monitor, everywhere in the eastern half of the country has no drought at all but the drought is starting to grow in the middle of the country. some of the farmers are starting to complain. this is the time when their corn really starts to mature. all of a sudden now starting to struggle a little bit. hopefully, we'll get some wet weather for them over the next couple of weeks. over the next five days, not a lot of rain on the map. maybe a couple inches down in florida. overall, it's going to be a pretty dry weather pattern over the next five days. right through the upcoming weekend. so your forecast for your wednesday, if you're traveling the airports today, maybe a few storms in the d.c. area late in the afternoon. just your typical hit and miss summer storms. same with atlanta. same with florida. notice the temperatures, very warm across the map. that's not really going to change much as we go throughout this week. if anything, the midwest likely to stay hot for the next one to two weeks.
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new york city, chance of 90 degrees today for the first time since middle of july. that big heat wave. remember that? seems like a year ago. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. [ male announcer ] this one goes out to all the allergy muddlers. you know who you are. you can part a crowd, without saying a word... if you have yet to master the quiet sneeze... you stash tissues like a squirrel stashes nuts... well muddlers, muddle no more. try zyrtec®. it gives you powerful allergy relief. and zyrtec® is different than claritin® because zyrtec® starts working at hour one on the first day you take it.
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paralysis. >> here now, nbc news -- you're supposed to read this. chief white house correspondent political director -- >> guys, this is on. you know this, on television. >> he said, kathy read this, donny reads it.
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>> no, you were not reading it. we were back on the air. >> i think it was because of a conversation we were -- >> we were talking about age spreads. >> how many bracelets do you have? >> well, these are all brought to me, given to me, by my daughters or charity. it kind of makes me seem sensitive. it's all a ruse. you wear this and they go, what are these? and you go, well, my daughter gave me. >> does that work? >> well -- >> like a puppy through the park? >> and i got two white labs so you do the math. >> i can attest to the cuteness of your white labs. the dogs -- i don't know you well enough -- >> what do you want to start with, donny' love life. >> dog's are a total chick magnet. >> i would never use the word chick though. >> all right. >> chuck's here. >> moving to ted cruz. obvious seque there. >> obvious. donny and ted cruz are both canadian. >> yes. >> they both love canada. >> and puppies. >> nicolle, i'm curious, do you
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look at what's happened over the last 48 hours to the tea party movement and are you smiling, happy? i say this because -- so ted cruz is having to -- i've had some republican operatives who are not fans of the tea party fleeful at the mcconnell challenger who lied about his resume. the guy's running against lamar who can't spell the word "senate." the fact that cruz has to renounce canadian citizenship. sort of a comeuppance moment for the tea party. >> i have respect for the ordinary citizens who self-identify as tea party members because of they're feeling fed up with the federal government both sides. because that's who they are. i have very little enthusiasm for the politicians who have tried to maximize off their frustration and exasperation with the government. they to me are opportunists. i think the tea party at its best is a grassroots voter movement that should have its choice among libertarians,
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republicans, democrats. i think cruz's biggest crime at the moment isn't having to renounce his canadian citizenship, it is his dishonesty, making these arguments about government shutdown. we've talked this morning, a great piece, that a very thoughtful conservative, a very loyal conservative, talks about how his intellectual dishonesty, when a voter asked him, why aren't you impeaching obama, he said, we don't have the votes. so to me when these politicians stumble, my satisfaction is that they're getting caught being untruthful. >> it seems to me we're watching a war inside the party and this time the establishment's engaging. like before the party three years ago, the establishment said, let's just appease them, it was an appeasement strategy. let's just try to co-op then a
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piece, some kind or another. did you see the ad, defending governing. hey, guess what, i like to govern. if you think this is a crime, vote me out. it was sort of interesting that you see the -- for your party, if you go through this fight and it is resolved in 2014, that's good news. the bad news will be if it bleeds into 2016. >> that's fair. >> republicans starting to say to you, chuck, listen, we are going to really push back on any conversation defunding health care if it's tied to shutting down the government. we're going to have a big serious pushback? >> i'm getting frustrated republicans in leadership who sit there and say, hey, there's nobody serious talking about this. mike lee is an intellectually honest conservative. i'm not saying that ted cruz isn't. but mike lee has been the
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intellectual force behind this movement. he is a very thoughtful critique on it. some people disagree with it. obviously ted cruz is the face of this movement. they had 12 signatures for this idea a month ago. they have 12 today. they got nowhere. what the republican leadership's going, hey, you guys in the media -- they're saying, hey, these guys, it's not going anywhere. mcconnell's not calling for it. you know, there's nobody serious who could actually propose this, calling for it. >> we're looking for an open of a show, it's going to be prevoktive. >> that's their beef. they admit, hey, they're the loudest voice. we got to be a little better about figuring -- >> the conversations we've been down the road before. it's not like there isn't some sort of precedent for talking about this. >> no, no, that's right. they're just arguing, hey, trust us, there's no movement here. it's not going to happen again. the problem, you know, it's like what's the fall going to look
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like? it's just going to be this -- i took the one budget expert who think it's going to go into january. and that this is really -- there's going to be all these stop gaps and we'll have this big fiscal gap again in january. it's simply because that's what house republicans believe the best -- you can get the best deal, to fought all things together, sequester debt ceiling and the budget all in one thing and then you get your deal, at the end, the best deal you can get from the president out of inertia. >> speaking of the president, i know it's summertime, he seems to be the most invisible he's ever been. you don't see or hear -- i'm not talking about the vacation. >> no, not only -- >> -- you know, you need to leave a little mystery, for lack of a better word. he's kind of gone away lately. >> we, i -- has he gone away or have people hit the mute button? i'm of the theory there's a little bit of -- charlie cook
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calls it second term fatigue. i think the nsa story has hurt the president with a group of voters. when you see this group of -- say, left-leaning independents under 40 who fought -- still believed, okay, at the end of the day, obama's not one of them. meaning one of washington. and the nsa story was sort of the last straw for these guys. they've been a little bit disappointed. feeling as if obama hadn't really changed washington enough. and the nsa -- because when you look at where his numbers have peeled away -- it may be just a summer swoon and it will then all come back. it looks like it's coming from people under 40. it's sort of that -- that was that extra special sauce that he had in his coalition. >> talking about the base supporters. >> it was his base. it wasn't democrat base but it was his base. i think the nsa story in particular with those folks -- because every explanation coming out of his mouth, coming out of the administration, has just been washington speak. and it was just sort of like, oh, you're just another one of them.
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>> the president doesn't need to worry about voters anymore. it's the second term. >> i've heard this complaint. people say, oh, great -- >> why worry about voters? >> if you don't have an approval rating over 50%, you can't get things done. >> you can't get things done with an approval rating. >> but if he's got more -- more of the moral high ground. you do have an ability to move the senate in a way. you will get those 14 or 15 republicans that want to govern with you. it does put pressure. he got a better fiscal deal during the fiscal cliff because he won re-election. so, you know, no, i think that -- your poll numbers -- are you a political force still? if you're sitting at 45%, you can't be -- you do need -- look, you've been there. >> i've been to this movie. i believe obama now has a lower approval rating at this point than bush did. >> right, prekatrina -- that's when the -- >> tell you, it's sort of when the wheels start to come off. i think obama -- i agree he's
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invisible. i think where it's really manifesting itself in a more perilous way than here at home is in foreign capitals. people around the world have no idea where we stand not just on egypt but we've been awol in syria. >> it's paralysis. >> we've got mccain and graham having a higher visibility and trying to do something in egypt. he's completely invisible on foreign policy. >> i've just come back from london. last week, "the guardian" had a big op-ed saying the white house is rudderless. there is no leadership. they were talking about egypt. you're right, a deep sense of -- talking about egypt, what's the latest on the budget? are we paying the aid to the egyptians? >> look, they're in this. every day, there's a new senator that comes out and says, cut aid. i think they feel they need to
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appease this group in congress. at the same time, they want to be in the door. so, you know, it is pragmatic paralysis in their defense. are you with assad, are you with al qaeda? right, there's the problem. it's pragmatic paralysis. the end of the day, you do get the sense it's not as if the western european leaders know what to do either. and they're not comfortable. >> they're taking a side -- in defense of the -- >> not egypt, no. not on egypt. >> they've done no more -- the president's been nothing more than the same thing the western european leaders have done. >> so this is what we aspire to? >> i'm just saying -- >> there you have it, all you need to know. obama's not any worse than old europe. >> it is this pragmatic streak in him. but it is this -- it's a form of isolationism. they don't like it to be called that because he likes to engage. but what are we engaging on?
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>> i think it's a desire in the white house to focus on domestic policies. >> because he's getting the view that this is a 25-year problem. and there's not much that can be done in -- >> -- obama's actually calling in today so it's easier -- >> fake tease. >> by the way, they can't hold you accountable after the fact. if i say you've got a one on one with barack obama, people tune in. >> the real trick on cable news, you just put up breaking news banners all the time. because at that moment, right, thomas, what you're saying is new to you. >> if you build it, they will come. >> that's right. >> on "the daily rundown," barack obama, raw, like you've never seen him before, 9:00 a.m. next, jim morrison. one of the original members of the doors is stepping out to defend his friend's legacy. we will talk to drummer john
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densmore. a sophomore at georgia tech delivers one of the best freshman welcome speeches ever. remember, barack obama. >> -- nobel prize laureates and presidents who graduated before us but to crush the shoulders of the giants upon whom we stand. we here are all such innovative people, so i am telling you, if you want to change the world -- ♪ [ male announcer ] staying warm and dry has never been our priority.
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welcome back to "morning joe." here with us now, the original drummer and founding member of the doors, john densmore. author of the new book, "the doors unhinged." jim morrison's legacy goes on trial. >> very exciting to have you here. >> i'm "evening john." you're "morning joe." >> it's a little too early, isn't it? >> you'll survive. >> so the doors unhinged talks a lot, obviously, not just about jim morrison, but the band. you guys were revolutionary as far as music went. also, you had a revolutionary business relationship that started in your garage band. >> it started with jim who said, i don't know how to play a chord on any instrument. i have these words and melodies but i don't know how to write a song. why don't we split everything?
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>> right. >> even the credit, lyrics by the doors. and so there was this foundation of four equal parts with veto power. i became mr. veto. >> you eventually vetoed a $15 million deal with cadillac. what were you thinking? >> i must be anti-american. we did very well. we were considering "come on, buick, light my fire. he said, great, i'll smash the car on television with a sledgehammer. that was a no. >> cadillac came at you with a
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$15 million deal and you said no. >> why? >> this is interesting. "light my fire" was primarily written by the guitar player. what does that say? he really cared about the whole catal catalog. >> jim died in 1971. >> it's sad, our keyboard player passed just a few months. i had a closing conversation with him and told him i loved him. and we were musical brothers. his left hand was the base joe's talking about. >> whether it's "light my fire" or other doors songs today and they are as fresh today -- they're still fresh to a lot of people younger than us. what does it say about music that lasts 30 years?
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>> it's the drumming. we had this great-looking singer. i don't care if it's -- it's the wedding of how the words fit with the melody. that's what hooks everybody in. >> he's on every warm-up tape i ever -- through college, everything like that. today it's the commercialism that comes first. that affects the artistry of it. >> today, it's so hard out there. i understand some new band paying the rent by using their songs for a commercial. but in our case, we had already
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done quite well and jim was against this. maybe you're a new band. maybe you get going. and then maybe you ought to look back and reconsider the idea of, as tom said, change your lyric into a jingle. you know, you do tweak the lyrics. so the audience -- without that product, the audience won't be fulfilled. that's changing what you wrote. >> you guys obviously had like most great bands through the years had a lot of fights. a lot of ups and downs. of course they formed the doors of the 21st century. it was fascinating. they went to stewart copland. famous for being the drummer of the police. and he ended up sort of calling 'em on this -- this scam. >> yeah, stewart is a wonderful drummer. >> i mean, the scam of calling it the doors of the 21st
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century. >> if i was asked to fill his shoes in the police, i could -- you know, the way he plays in that band. he wears gloves when he plays. it's that tight. and he was let go because he was calling them, saying, hey, wait a minute, i respect john, can we use the name here? is this cool? and then he eventually testified for me in the trial. which was wonderful. >> where did you meet jim morrison? >> i met him in ray's garage. he was in the corner. he was shy. and once we got a few club gigs, he still would not face the audience. he would look at us for security. and then he turned into the lizard king, didn't he? >> yes, quite a picture about that. >> that came out of nowhere, right. >> the book is "the doors
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unhinged," jim morrison's legacy goes on trial. >> great to have you here, thank you so much for coming. >> nice being on the panel. >> it's great having you on the panel. >> we'll be back with much more "morning joe." right now, 7 years of music is being streamed. a quarter million tweeters are tweeting. and 900 million dollars are changing hands online.
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survive that crash. >> was that planned? >> did looks like the "dukes of hazzard" stuff. >> i think it's total accident. i don't know what's happened before. that's the thing with vine, it's only six or seven seconds. i'm glad he didn't die. sullivan, brian sullivan, cnbc, business. i don't have a natural seque so i will just ask you, we had a debate on the table here earlier about the fed head, whether it be janet yellen, do you think there's a consensus on wall street? >> no. brian, i know you miss your cnbc days talking about who the next fed chairman's going to be and handicapping the change in language in the fed minutes, don't you? just be honest. >> i do miss those street signs additions when you bring out the fed minutes. >> thank you. >> i too miss cnbc. >> i know, but i don't even
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think the fed existed back then, did they? or at least, donny, nobody cared about the fed, which is the way i wish it still was. >> but on wall street they want larry summers or yell en or the just want whoever can goose the profits? >> i think they want clarity. what they want depends on who you ask, right. janet yellen has been seen as the forerunner in a number of wall street surveys. however, as we know, the white house has been floating out larry summers. a great piece by ezra klein in the -- i believe it was by ezra in "the washington post" yesterday saying why isn't the white house looking harder at yellen, perhaps the way she kind does things independently. either way, i think what wall street guys, you certainly know this, what they want is clarity. they want to know when is taper going to end. when are rates going up. who's going to be the next fed chairman. that's what they want more than anything else is clarity. i appreciate the tease, because today at 2:00 p.m. eastern, the fed will release minutes of the last meeting.
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happens to be live on my show. i've got a special t-shirt shaped like a tuxedo. >> we bring you in for the important stuff. so we need to know about the slurpy. >> thank you. because it is summer. okay. the story's out that maybe, just maybe, 7 eleven and fox con will team up to make a 7 eleven branded phone, honestly, slurpee phone, whatever you want to call it. i would be kind of cool about it. >> what would be cool about it? >> will it be a cup holder and will we try to limit the size in new york city, i don't know. >> slurpee i phone. >> you like the burger with the name on the top too. >> the branded -- >> i do love the burger with the name on the bun. >> the slurpee phone -- >> very reactictionarreactionar stand in the way of progress.
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it's one of the most epic college welcome speeches we've ever seen. watch as georgia tech sophomore nick shelby welcomes freshman to school like it's never been done before. >> our mission as students is not to follow in the foot steps of the astronauts and presidents who graduated before us but to exceed their foot steps. crush the shoulders of the giants upon whom we stand. i am telling you, if you want to change the world, you're at georgia tech! you can do that! if you want to build the ironman suit, you're at georgia tech, you can do that! if you want to play theme music during your speech like a bad ass, we're at georgia tech, we can do that! i am doing that! >> coming up neck, what, if anything, did we learn today from that speech?
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here's your business travel forecast. a warm day. feeling like summer across the country coast to coast. 90s possibly for the first time in a month. do you believe that? for new york city afternoon storms, maybe some minor problems down through georgia, florida. very warm in the intermountain west. end. then i better use the capital one purchase eraser to redeem my venture miles for this trip. purchase eraser? it's the easy way to erase any recent travel expense. i just pick a charge, like my flight with a few taps, it's taken care of. impressive baldwin. does it work for hotels? absolutely thank goodness. mrs. villain and i are planning our...
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you scare me. and i like it. let's go what's in your wallet? i just served my mother-in-law your chicken noodle soup but she loved it so much... i told her it was homemade. everyone tells a little white lie now and then. but now she wants my recipe [ clears his throat ] [ softly ] she's right behind me isn't she? [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup.
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you may be muddling through allergies. try zyrtec® for powerful allergy relief. and zyrtec® is different than claritin® because it starts working faster on the first day you take it. zyrtec® love the air. really quick, what did we learn today? >> even though it's self-parody with georgia tech, just about everyone thought it was good except donny. >> i learned bill de blasio is a boston red sox fan. new york city mayoral candidate.
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>> food is food, no logos on it. >> i learned you are one cynical dude. >> but a very good chicken. >> i just thought that kid was a jerk. up next, chuck todd, exclusive 101, full hour with barack obama, coming up right now. >> that is not true. horrifying allegations and pictures coming out of syria. rebel groups say they have proof of chemical attacks. syria's government denies it. we'll get the latest on these developments in another troubles piece of the middle east. the most famous soon to be ex-canadian who lives in texas, senator cruz, in a heated town hall. could an awkward moment be coming for two conservative stars in the lone star state? here in gotham, anthony weiner's wild spiral to single digits may have opened the door for an unexpected contender and maybe the next mayor. bill de blasio. feeling like he's got a lot of mojo with just 20 days till

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